Blood Type
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Blood Type

What Is Blood Type?
Introduction
Blood Type (BT) is a hereditary trait that plays a part in determining a foal’s potential and in some cases can also be a cause of negative anomalies. Every horse on FFH has one of five main Blood Types – referred to as I, II, III, IV or V. A horse can be any of these five types, but it will always inherit the Blood Type of either its sire or dam. For example, a foal with a type I sire and a type IV dam can only be either type I or type IV.
Secondary Blood Type
In addition to a horse’s main Blood Type, there is a secondary factor referred to as Secondary Blood Type. Secondary Blood Type is completely hidden and can never be revealed. Secondary Blood Type works in a similar fashion to main Blood Type in that the crossing of a sire and dam’s Secondary Blood Type will have an impact on the resulting foal’s stats. However, the impacts of Secondary Blood Type are minor and serve the purpose of enhancing the Blood Type system.
Blood Type Mutations
All horses have a rare chance to receive one of two genetic mutations at birth. The first of these mutations will cause the horse to almost always act as if it has the worst possible bloodline match when bred. Even in a perfect cross, it will still be treated as if it is a I x V cross. In other words, it has a mutation that makes a horse's Blood Type unmatchable, resulting in significantly worse foals overall. This is often referred to as a bad mutation (-).

The second mutation is a good mutation (+) that will cause a horse’s bloodline to almost always roll as if it’s an exact match to any horse it is bred with. In this case, you could breed type I x V and it would still be treated as if it's a perfect match. Horses with this mutation will throw more good foals than the average horse, as every cross is essentially a perfect match.

If both parents have the same mutation, the chances of negative/positive results are amplified. If both parents have a bad mutation, there's almost no chance the foal will escape the impacts of it. If both parents have a good mutation, it will almost certainly receive bonuses to stats. On the flip side, if both parents have different mutations, the effect of both is nullified.

You can test for mutations via the genetics page if a horse is pensioned or has at least 10 foals on the ground. The price varies based on gender. However, there is no way to prevent them from happening or guarantee they happen. There is no way to fix them. Horses who have a mutation are not more likely to pass on the mutation.

Horse Trader horses, created Goldbloods, Imports, and Select Sale horses are all exempt from mutations, but their offspring are not.
Determining Blood Type
Blood Tests and Blood Ranges
The easiest way to determine a horse’s Blood Type is to use a Blood Test. This can be done at the Geneticist for FFH cash. It can also be done through the Blood Test item, which is available in the Pro Shop for PC. You can also buy a horse’s Blood Type via their Genetic page – a “Buy” Button will appear under the Blood Type heading. It is always recommended you buy some form of Blood Test for stallions unless he is Cloaked or Tomed. (More on those below.)

You can also determine a horse's approximate type by buying a Blood Range test at the Geneticist for FFH cash or PC. This will tell you what range your horse falls into: I-III, II-IV, or III-V. If a horse has a blood type that could be in multiple ranges, which range is displayed is random. For example, a Type II horse could display I-III or II-IV. While this is not an exact science and does not allow you to make perfect matches, it is much more affordable than a Blood Test. Blood Ranges are excellent choices for good quality mares when you want to breed the best possible foals.
Verifying Blood Type
There are two cases where it is possible to "verify" blood type without having to test the individual horse. You can do this through parentage or through foals.

You can verify the exact blood type of a foal if both their sire and their dam have the same tested blood type. Example: Charlie Thoroughbred's sire is tested type I and his dam is tested type I. He will have a verify button on his page and will be type I.

A horse may be verified through their offspring if they produce a tested foal who is a different type from their other tested parent. Example, Foal 1 has a sire tested II, and an unknown dam. Foal 1 ends up being tested and is Type III. His unknown dam is then able to be verified as Type III.

This also works on Cloaked Line horses. If they produce a foal that is different type than a tested parent, a verify button will show up on their page and they will no longer be cloaked line. It does not work on Cloaked horses since you cannot test their offspring, but it can help you to figure out cloaked bloodtypes if the cloaked line that is verified ends up different from their tested parent.

You can verify types on other people's horses so it's always worth going back in pedigrees to see if you can verify any horse, because it can cause a chain reaction that allows entire lines to be tested, therefore saving a lot of money!
Deduction Via Pedigree Studying
This is the most simplistic way to determine Blood Type, but it should be done with care, as you will be relying on your own understanding of Blood Type.

You can determine a horse's Blood Type by checking their parents. If either of a horse's parents are Cloaked, they will be Cloaked Line. This means that their Blood Type is hidden and cannot be determined without the use of a Runemaster's Tome (which allows you to set a new BT of your choice). CLOAKED LINE IS NOT THE SAME AS CLOAKED. (More on this later.)

However, if neither parent is Cloaked, you can determine your foal's type based upon the parents. For example, if a foal's dam is type II-IV and the foal's sire is type IV, you know she is II-IV. Since both parents technically fall within the II-IV category, you can safely list her as II-IV. On the other hand, if a mare's dam is I-III and her sire is III-V, she could be either I-III or III-V. In this case there is no way to narrow her Blood Type down any further, so she would be labeled I-V or unknown.

If either of a horse's parents are untested or unranged, or if a horse is 'Cloaked Line', they are considered to have an unknown Blood Type. They should be labeled accordingly, even if you suspect they fall into a certain category based on their pedigree or how they produce. It's fine to make notes on their page to indicate your suspicions, but you should say it is only a suspicion and should take care not to mislabel them in mini notes or when sending breeding requests.
Impacts Of Blood Type
Matching And Breeding
When you breed two horses together, their Blood Type is compared and can either have a positive, negative, or perhaps little to no influence over the foal. BT primarily influences the stats of a horse, raising or lowering them from the 'base' predetermined by the stat genes. It can also, in the worst crosses (I x V), result in negative anomalies as well.

When the types of the parents are 3-4 apart, negative impacts may result. The only BT crosses that can possibly fall into the 'bad' cross category are I x IV, II x V, and I x V. Negative impacts of poor BT crosses mostly impact stats, as noted above, reducing the maximum potential of the foal. However, in 4 apart crosses (I x V), the foal may also suffer negative anomalies. This can cause any gene, at random, to end up much lower than it should have been. For more on genetic anomalies, visit the Genetic Anomalies page. r
A 'perfect' cross is one in which both parents share the same Blood Type (such as I x I). When perfect crosses occur, the foal may receive a substantial bonus to their base stats. Blood Types that are only 1-2 apart will often have no noticeable influence on the foal, although they can also give a (less substantial) bonus to a foal's stats. Examples of this are I x II, II x IV, and so on. Any match that falls within this category is considered a good match.
Supplements, Items And Traits
Prodigy Prodigy will increase bloodline compatibility for 1 year, making all matches at least average (2-off) quality. 1 use. Stallions must use during the breeding season. Mares must use before covering.
Blood Test A Blood Test can be used on a horse to reveal their blood type, which will appear on their Genetics page. Each item can only be used once.
Mistweaver’s Cloak This ancient cloak will both randomize your horse’s bloodline and conceal it for the horse and its offspring. It may improve Heritage, Peak, and Prime genes. It also improves producer quality. This has 3 uses. Must be used before a horse has any foals on the ground.
Runemaster’s Tome This dusty, leather-bound tome is filled with ancient knowledge, written in symbols only comprehensible by the most skilled of runemasters. Allow them to cast one of these mysterious runic spells upon your horse and witness their Bloodline transform right in front of your eyes! You'll be able to select which new Blood Type you want applied to your horse. Must be used before a horse has any foals on the ground. Works on Cloaked Line but NOT Cloaked horses.
Love At First Sight Mares may occasionally earn a Love at First Sight trait through Sparks of Joy. (Mares who were given a Bucket of Love prior to July 22nd, 2018 also have this trait.) Love at First Sight works very much like a 'good' bloodline mutation, ensuring the horse is always a perfect BT match with any horse they are bred to. This effect is permanent.